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may be offensive. c-span: at what point did you decide to do a documentary on the detroit? >> guest: i'm from the area. i was born and raised in the dietrich areas of there was a personal connection. i never considered making a film in detroit or with any personal ties to myself whatsoever. but my co-director and body, rachel, started talking about the city of detroit in late 2008, because i would return home and things seemed to be getting worse and worse. it was all pretty bad when i grew up there in the 80's. so to see the crisis spread out further and further into the suburbs and a lot of people i knew were leaving and we started discussing what was the future of this place, but wouldn't like, then in october of 2009i came with my crew for three days as an experiment and filmed in a city just as an outsider and talked to a few people and absolutely riveted by the people and the place. and i thought there's definitely a movie here. i'm not sure what it is that we need to make a film and in detroit. c-span: i read that you're father had an impact on you and his business is over the y
and the loss of more than half of detroit's population as a result. 8:00 eastern, booktv in prime time. tonight the focus on book fairs and festivals of the past year, including a discussion from the harlem book fair, and a look at the book, "stalin secrets," author ann romney and a book about whitty bulger. we'll -- >> i'm not some sort of anti-suburb person who thinks everyone needs to live in new york city and, you know i was very sensitive to be coming across as a sort of a espresso-sipping, condo-dwelling elitist of sometime. that is not why i did this book. i understand why people like the suburbs. i get fed up with a lot of daily life in new york city a lot. i was more drawn, the trend were so undeniable. the fact there is a shift the way suburban america perceived by people that live there is too big of a story to ignore. >> the earliest extent letter we have, dates to october 1762 and we call it the miss adorable letter because that is how john adams opens the letter. so it is john writing to abigail and he says, miss adorable, by the same token that the bearer here of sat up with laws
million of our residents are on food stamps today. one in three households in detroit, according to the associated press, four out of five u.s. adults struggle with joblessness, near porveghts or reliance on welfare. there's no shortage of labor in the united states. there is a shortage of jobs in the united states. our goal must be to help our struggling americans move from dependency to independence, to help them find steady jobs and rising pay, not declining pay. our policy cannot be to simply relegate more and more of our citizens to dependence on the government while importing a steady stream of foreign workers to take the available jobs. that is not in the interest of our country or the people of this country. some contend our unemployed don't have the needed skills. well, let's train them. we now spend over $750 billion a year on means-tested welfare assistance-type programs. that's the largest item in the budget, bigger than social security, bigger than defense, bigger than medicare. and of that amount, we spend about -- for every $100 we spend on those programs, we only
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3